Volume 7, Issue 1, February 2019, Page: 22-26
Aboveground Biomass Dynamics in the Low-Mountain Dry Grasslands of the Tianshan Mountains
Xiaotao Huang, Key Laboratory of Restoration Ecology for Cold Regions in Qinghai, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, China; University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Geping Luo, University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, China
Hao Wang, University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, China
Jean Baptiste Nsengiyumva, University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, China
Received: Mar. 19, 2019;       Published: May 23, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijema.20190701.13      View  113      Downloads  15
Abstract
Identifying the dynamics of aboveground biomass (AB) is vital for effective grassland management, yet knowledge on this phenomenon remains limited in the low-mountain dry grasslands (LMDG) of the Tianshan Mountains. In this study, systematic observations were conducted from 2014 to 2017 to determine AB dynamics in the LMDG of the Tianshan Mountains. To accomplish this, a cutting experiment, an HL20 Bowen ratio system, and TDR300 and WatchDog1400 systems were used. AB dynamics had unique characteristics, because of the influence of the unique environment of this region. AB increased rapidly in spring (April – May), and then increased slowly in summer (June – August) and autumn (September – October). Plants entered dormancy in summer (primarily August). In autumn, plants continued to grow after dormancy, except in years with low precipitation which limited plant growth. Plants generally suffered from water stress in this region. However, in spring, the limiting factor for plant growth was heat, not water. Heat might also be the limiting factor for plant growth in autumn. The results are expected to enhance the understanding of AB dynamics in the LMDG of the Tianshan Mountains, providing data to support local grassland management.
Keywords
Aboveground Biomass, Low-Mountain Dry Grassland, Water Stress, Soil Volumetric Water Content
To cite this article
Xiaotao Huang, Geping Luo, Hao Wang, Jean Baptiste Nsengiyumva, Aboveground Biomass Dynamics in the Low-Mountain Dry Grasslands of the Tianshan Mountains, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 22-26. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20190701.13
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