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Volume 8, Issue 5, October 2020, Page: 144-154
Effect of Lime and Phosphorus Fertilizer on Soybean [Glycine max L. (Merrill)] Grain Yield and Yield Components at Mettu in South Western Ethiopia
Tolossa Ameyu, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Jimma Agricultural Research Center, Jimma, Ethiopia
Efrem Asfaw, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Jimma Agricultural Research Center, Jimma, Ethiopia
Received: Jun. 8, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 22, 2020;       Published: Sep. 24, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijema.20200805.13      View  42      Downloads  17
Abstract
Soil acidity and poor soil fertility are regarded as crop productivity limiting factors particularly in south western Ethiopia. Acidic soils limit the productive potential of crops because of low availability of basic cations and excess of hydrogen and aluminium in exchangeable forms. At the study area, soil acidity is a well-known problem limiting crop productivity. This, study was conducted to determine the effect of lime and phosphorus fertilizers on soybean yields and to explore the best treatments that can maximize the productivity of soybean. Factorial combinations of five lime levels (0, 1.41, 2.82, 4.23 and 5.64 t ha-1) and four P levels (0, 10, 20 and 30kg P ha-1) were laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three replications. Data on yield and yield components, were collected and analyzed using SAS version 9.3 software. Treatment means were compared at 5% level of significance using List Significant Different Test. The results revealed that Lime x phosphorus interactions were significant (p<0.01) for some yield and yield components. Findings showed that the application of phosphorus (30Kg/ha) significantly increased the plant height (67.03 cm), number of pods per plant (49), number of seeds per plant (77.67) above ground biomass (6160Kg/ha) and the grain yield (1828.44 Kg/ha). A combined application of phosphorous at 30 kg/ha and lime at 5.64 t ha-1 had good response in reclaiming the soil and fostering the crop productivity, which is statically at pars with 4.23 lime t/ha and 30 P kg/ha. Study concluded that application of lime with phosphorus proved to be superior with respect to grain yield as well as other yield and growth parameters of soybean. The result of this study verified that application of lime and Phosphorus improved yield and yield related traits of soybean crop. In conclusion further study should be conducted to determine the response of different maturity group of soybean varieties to appropriate rates or combination of lime and phosphorus fertilizers which can maximize the productivity of the crop and reduce soil acidity problem in the study area and finally, the study should be conducted across different acid soil and the agricultural extension suggest the farmers as they apply lime based on the concentration of acid saturation cation until the best combination of lime and phosphorus will be determined.
Keywords
Lime, Phosphorus, Soil Acidity and Soybean
To cite this article
Tolossa Ameyu, Efrem Asfaw, Effect of Lime and Phosphorus Fertilizer on Soybean [Glycine max L. (Merrill)] Grain Yield and Yield Components at Mettu in South Western Ethiopia, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 8, No. 5, 2020, pp. 144-154. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20200805.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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